CALLA

CALLA

Callas belong to the Zantedeschia botanical genus, part of the Araceae family to which also belong Anthuriums, Spathiphyllums, and Philodendrons, etc. The name "calla" comes from the Greek “callos” meaning beautiful, due to their particularly magnificent flowers. Callas are native to South Africa. Their flower is actually a structure consisting of a big spathe (a transformed leaf) which forms a calix and which contains the true inflorescence made up of a spadix. At the base of the spadix are the female flowers and at the top are the male ones. Callas like full sun and moist, but well-drained soil because their rhizomes are very sensitive to waterlogging. Callas need frequent watering that must, however, be suspended in the summer when the plant goes dormant. The white calla is a perennial plant that forms big shrubs that grow bigger year after year. This type of calla stops growing in summer and begins growing in autumn, to then flower in spring. Coloured callas (yellow, mauve, red) are native to hot countries and cannot survive the winter frost; this is why they must be cultivated in vases and placed in cold greenhouses during the winter season. This type of calla goes dormant in summer and from then on it must not be watered, but left dry all winter long in a site where the temperature does not go below 0°C. As soon as the danger of frost is over, the vases can be taken out and watered; the plants will then begin to vegetate and to produce flowers until summer. Feed once a month with a soluble fertilizer dissolved in the watering can. Usually, callas are very hardy but they can be attacked by aphids and slugs that feed on their leaves.

pianta da fiore calla