GERBERA

GERBERA

The Gerbera genus belongs to the Asteraceae (composite) family and includes about 70 species. This plant is made up of a rosette of lanceolate and downy leaves from which arise long flower stems at the top of which are big daisy-like flowers. Gerbera jamesonii is called the “Daisy of Transvaal” because it comes from the Transvaal plateau, where it lives among the rocks in shady areas, at an altitude of 1100 meters a.s.l. This plateau is characterized by frequent rainfall and an average temperature of 16°C. Although the work of geneticists has contributed to creating hundreds of new varieties with very diverse characteristics, the ideal site for the growth of the gerbera plant remains its original habitat. In fact, it requires a hot ecological niche, with moist soil and diffused luminosity, but protected from direct sunlight and from wind. In particular, the soil must be rich in organic substances, well-drained, and—if possible—deep, because the gerbera plant's roots can reach a depth of one meter. An ideal composition for the potting compost can be a mixture of 80% peat and 20% perlite or expanded clay, with the addition of a ternary fertilizer with slow-release microelements. When planting gerberas outdoors, make sure the temperature of the air and of the soil is above 16°C because the plants do not vegetate below this level and below 5°C, they risk dying. They must be watered regularly so that the soil always remains slightly wet, but not drenched because this could easily make the roots rot. To protect the gerberas from dangerous waterlogging near the neck, repot or transplant, being careful to place the base of the plant a bit higher than the surrounding ground. Feed with a complex soluble fertilizer rich in microelements with plenty of phosphorus and potassium, to be dissolved in the water used for irrigation.

pianta da fiore geranio gerbera