CARNATION

CARNATION

Dianthus cariophyllus is the botanical name of the carnation, native to the temperate regions of the world. Its scientific name comes from a Greek word which means “flowers of the gods”. To obtain an infinite range of colours, shapes, and sizes, growers and geneticists have done plenty of work in breeding and improving the carnation. A particular field of research on the carnation has been aimed at reducing its scent in order to allow for its indoor use and to avoid attracting insects that, in pollinating the flower, reduce its duration. Besides the classical “large carnation”, the big variety used for its cut flowers, we now appreciate the so-called miniature carnation, which is used to create bouquets. Recently, numerous varieties of dwarf carnations, characterized by plants that form low shrubs with compact and long-lasting flowers suitable for cultivation in vases and gardens, have been selected. The dwarf carnation can be kept indoors in winter and placed on the balcony or in the garden in spring-summer. If carnations are grown in locations that are not too cold, they can be left outdoors even in winter. Carnations require full sun or part-shade. The soil of the vase or of the flower bed must be well-drained. Carnations are much more resistant to drought than to an excess of water. Dwarf carnations must be fertilized frequently because these remontant plants need a lot of nutrients for their physiological growth. They must be fed once every 15-20 days, dissolving a complex, water-soluble fertilizer (e.g. 20-20-20) in the watering can.

pianta da fiore garofano