FUCHSIA

FUCHSIA

Fuchsia is the name of a plant and also that of a colour which takes its name from the flowers of this plant and which signifies shocking magenta. Around one hundred species of shrubby and herbaceous plants native to South and Central America and to New Zealand belong to the Fuchsia genus. This name comes from L. Fuchs, a German naturalist of the 16th century. As said before, the plants can be both herbaceous plants and shrubs. The herbaceous species, suitable for vases and hanging baskets, are shrubby and have branches that may either be erect or pendulous. Fuchsias are perennial plants. However, the herbaceous species do not tolerate the winter cold; they must, therefore, be cultivated as annuals, unless, at the end of the good season, they are placed in sites where the temperature does not go below 9/19°C. Fuchsias produce characteristic tubular flowers that are very showy. Eight coloured stamens arise from their petals that have of a variety of shades of fuchsia. The hybrid species that are now on sale need to be kept in the shade or in part-shade. The potting compost must contain about 70% organic material (a mix of peat and loam) and a remaining 30% sand or perlite to keep the substratum well-drained. Fuchsias require constantly wet soil and must be watered frequently and abundantly so as not to let the foliage wither. Avoid placing the plant in sites that are too windy or where the microclimate is too dry. Feed once every fortnight dissolving a complex fertilizer in the watering can, being careful to use it sparingly as not to damage the plant with excessive salinity. Diseases that attack fuchsias are mainly due to insects (aphids, white butterflies) and mites (red spider mites). To cure them, we suggest the use of specific products easily found in garden centers.

pianta da fiore fuchsia